Posts in Wildlife
The damage of post-fire logging, the Hoax of 'salvage'

A forest after fire is not a tragedy; it’s simply a stage in the life of the forest. Post-fire logging is  often framed as focused on fire prevention. In reality, important biological characteristics are removed from post-fire forests. Because of this, salvage logging acts as an unnatural human disturbance to the sensitive post fire landscape.

Read More
Groundbreaking KS Wild Climate Change Report

Fighting fossil fuel projects like the proposed Jordan Cove liquefied natural gas export project is only half of the climate change battle in our region. Climate change is getting worse fast so we also have to act to prepare the Klamath-Siskiyou for a warming world. KS Wild has just assembled the best available science in a comprehensive report to help show the path forward to help public lands adapt to climate change.

Read More
Climate, Water, WildlifeTim Ream
Where will wolves go from here?

At KS Wild, we have a deep admiration for this creature that so deeply epitomizes the wilderness. Unfortunately, the story of the wolf is one of systematic persecution and deep-rooted mythologies that inspire fear in people. Some say the removal of the wolf is a bitter reflection of our society’s tendency to suppress all things wild; others, want nothing more than to allow wolves to fade into extinction.

Read More
Wildlife Advocacy

Part of our work at KS Wild is to track management decisions by the US Fish and Wildlife service to list at-risk species as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act. In continuing a 22-year battle to protect their declining populations, we filed lawsuit with three of our conservation allies to list the Pacific fisher. Other species we continue to fight for include the Siskiyou Mountain Salamander, the Wolverine and four species of Lamprey.

Read More
Oregon Spotted Frog, WildlifeKlamath Siskiyouconservation, environment, ecosystem, klamath-siskiyou, ks wild, biodiversity, wildlife, oregon spotted frog, spotted frog, Rana pretiosa, northern spotted owls, birds, amphibians, Strix occidentalis caurina, pacific fisher, mammals, madrones, Arbutus unedo, oak, quercus, trees, botanticals, salmonidae, salmon, forests, salvage, forestfire, wildfire, endemic, appalachia, southern appalachia, migration, mexico, central mexico, southern oregon, northern california, oregon, california, protection, at-risk species, us fish and wildlife, threatened species, endangered species, endangered species act, siskiyou mountain salamander, Plethodon stormi, wolverine, Gulo gulo, lamprey, petromyzantiformes, fish, wildlands, gray wolves, gray wolf, wolves, wolf, western wolf, timber wolf, american wolf, Canis lupis, animals, source habitat, hotspots, kalmiopsis, siskiyou crest, marble mountains, trinity alps, cascade range, road-building, northern goshawk, Accipiter gentilis, marbled murrelet, Brachyramphus marmoratus, red tree vole, Arborimus longicaudus, western pond turtle, Actinemys marmorata, Emys marmorata, green sturgeon, Acipenser medirostris, coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, game management, wildlife conservation, hunting, fishing, department of fish and wildlife, oregon department of fish and wildlife, funding, climate, jack creek, fremont-winema national forest, cattle, grazing, drought, forest service, wetlands, jack creek wetlands, riparian, groundwater, logging, Martes pennanti
This Land is Your Land Stewardship and Our Public Lands

Environmental stewards can operate in a variety of ways: as practitioners, donors, and doers. Our staff works hard each day as practitioners, working directly with government agencies and stakeholders to promote best practices in the management of our public lands. Foundations and community members serve as vital donors, providing financial support for our work. The doers are all of you—KS Wild members, volunteers, interns, and partners—who take part in our work, voice your support for public lands, or even just get out on a hike.

Read More
Public Lands for All

While most Americans cherish the idea that public lands belong to and benefit all of us, corporate timber, mining and grazing interests have long sought to privatize public lands in order to maximize profits to their respective industries. While subsidized logging, mining and grazing occur on the vast majority of public lands, these extremists bristle at the idea of there being any rules regarding their exploitation of our forests and rivers.

Read More
Homecoming

After decades of trapping and poisoning, the last wolf in California was shot in 1924. Since then, roads and highways were built and huge tracts of forest have been converted to industrial tree farms. Today, the wolf re-enters a landscape filled with strip-malls, subdivisions, climatic shifts and severe drought. It will take work with residents in areas where wolves migrate to ensure co-existence.

Read More
Wolf OR-7 is a Father

Good news for wolves! The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife reported in June that Wolf OR-7 and his mate have at least two pups, seen peeking out from a log to the right. While OR-7’s female companion is not as well known, her untold story is just as miraculous.

Read More